twwwologo



drawing


THE UNDERGROUND
Recorded on Friday, October 7, 2016, at 5:00 pm, at Berardo Museum Collection, Portugal.

Speakers: Kai Bosworth, Anna Tsing, Stuart McLean.

Beneath tangible material structures are invisible territories whose infinitesimal processes rule the metabolic circuitry of our ecosystems. Prolific bacteria sojourn in the depths of glacial caves and mycelium networks spread beyond the informational substrates captured by our eyes. Future organisms incubate in the underground, while matter faces permanent transmutation with no sense of decay. Tardean theory has taught us that the human species was forced to travel underground and invent a new way of life in the “interminable honeycomb” of the Earth. How then, should we consider the complex subterranean dimensions of geological forces, matter and energy today? Black goo. Bogs. Liquid-solid indeterminacy. How have these spheres altered our social consciousness and imaginaries?
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KAI BOSWORTH is a PhD candidate in the department of Geography, Society and Environment at the University of Minnesota, where he researches how public controversy around resource extraction and transportation is changing political conceptions of land, property, and the underground. Through an examination of oil pipeline infrastructure in North America, Kai’s dissertation examines the ways in which mainstream environmentalist responses to pipeline infrastructure reinforce a liberal and populist conception of agrarian democracy. This research forms part of a broader investigation into feminist and Marxist spatial and environmental theory in the Anthropocene. Kai holds a B.A. in Environmental Studies from Macalester College and an M.A. in Geography from the University of Minnesota. His works have appeared in Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, The Extractive Industries and Society, and Capitalism and the Earth (forthcoming from Punctum books).
ANNA TSING is professor of Anthropology at University of California, Santa Cruz. She is also Niels Bohr professor at Aarhus University in Denmark and director of Aarhus University Research on the Anthropocene (AURA). Her current research follows the humble trails of mushrooms into the great economic, cultural, and ecological dilemmas of our times. She is the author of The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins, Friction: An Ethnography of Global Connection, and In the Realm of the Diamond Queen: Marginality in an Out-of-the-way Place, all from Princeton University Press. She has co-edited numerous volumes, most recently, with Carol Gluck, Words in Motion: Towards a Global Lexicon, from Duke University Press.
STUART MCLEAN is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Minnesota.  He has carried out fieldwork in Ireland and the Orkney Islands.  His research explores intersections between anthropology and literature and the relationship of human creativity to long term processes of environmental change, while asking what might happen to anthropology and to the humans it claims to study if it were to take seriously the other than human ‘life’ of the materials from which human worlds are fashioned. His latest book, Fictionalizing Anthropology: Encounters and Fabulations, Human and Other(forthcoming, University of Minnesota Press, Fall 2017) undertakes a comprehensive revisioning of anthropology as a mode of engaged creative practice carried forward in a world heterogeneously composed of humans and other-than-humans.




EARTH METABOLISMS
Recorded on Sunday, June 19, 2016, 5:30 pm, at Berardo Museum Collection, Portugal.

SPEAKERS: Mi You, Paul N. Edwards, Peter Fend.

Perturbations are now common to energy flows in the different spheres of life. What happens when technology rivals nature and uses energy to transform information and materials (data, fossil fuels, solar energy, wind and hydropower) and guide the metabolism of matter? What constitutes its dynamical flow? How have whole cycles within the Biosphere and Technosphere been transformed, deviated, and modified by human extended metabolism? How does contemporary socio-metabolism compare with the current metabolism of the terrestrial biosphere?
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MI YOU is a Beijing-born writer, curator and associate researcher at Academy of Media Arts Cologne. Her research interests include the history and meta-history of the heartland of Eurasia, philosophy of immanence in both Western and Chinese Neo-Confucian traditions, and philosophy of performance and science and technology. She curates performances and media art, most recently at Asian Culture Center Theater in South Korea and the inaugural Media Art Festival in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.
PAUL N. EDWARDS is Professor in the School of Information and the Dept. of History at the University of Michigan. He writes and teaches about the history, politics, and culture of knowledge and information infrastructures. His book A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming (2010) was named a Book of the Year by The Economist  magazine in 2010, and received the Louis J. Battan Book Prize of the American Meteorological Society and the Computer History Museum Prize. Before joining the University of Michigan, Edwards taught at Stanford University and Cornell University. He is currently working on a collection of essays under the working title Knowledge Infrastructures for the Anthropocene.
PETER FEND builds an architecture practice based on paradigms from art. The two leading sources are Marcel Duchamp and Joseph Beuys. From one, Fend uses the Fontaine, or Urinal, to systematically map and satellite-monitor the planet in its saltwater basins. From the other, Fend uses earth-art designs to restore wild-animal and wild-plant habitats ("Chief of the Hunters"), and produces energy within a cycle of oxygen-carbon dioxide-methane, in exchanges by animals-plants, bacteria and archaebacteria ("Fat Corner"). Trained in history but aiming to do architecture, Peter Fend discovered in the 1970s a huge movement of artists expanding into our environment, with earth art, motile display of spectral data, lightweight structures, and began displaying what to build in Caltech ( Feb 1978).




WATER POLITICS
Recorded on Saturday, June 18, 2016, 5:30 pm, at Berardo Museum Collection, Portugal.

SPEAKERS: Ravi Agarwal, João Camargo, Joyeeta Gupta.

At a time when we need to rethink the distribution of resources beyond the perimeter of the nation-state, the sole notion of property needs to be reconsidered. At this very moment, multinational corporations invade the lawless breaches of international waters, colonizing nature, and developing matrixes of energetic resource exploitation that neglect the balance of the biosphere. In the meantime, toxicity levels have risen to unparalleled degrees across lands, just as access to clean water in the Global South is strongly regulated by the trade relations of the Global North. How can we comprehend the fluidity of ecosystemic relations and the need for new models of political resilience? 
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RAVI AGARWAL is an artist, environmental activist, writer and curator. He is the founder of the well known Indian NGO Toxics Link and has been internationally awarded for his work. His recent work has been traversing questions of the self and ecological sustainability based on explorations of ‘personal ecologies.’ Agarwal has shown in several international shows including Documenta XI (2002), Kassel , Germany, Sharjah Biennial (2013) He is an Engineer by training.
JOAO CAMARGO is a Portuguese/Brazilian animal scientist, environmental engineer and activist. He has been very active in labour and anti-austerity movements, namely organizing the Que Se Lixe a Troika protests in 2012 and 2013, and participating in Precários Inflexíveis, an association of precarious workers. He has worked as a journalist, taught Botany and Chemistry in Universidade Lúrio, in Mozambique, and headed public intervention in the League for the Protection of Nature, a portuguese environmental NGO, for four years. Currently studying public policy on climate change in Portugal, Spain and Morocco, he is involved with the climate justice group Climáximo and is currently participating in the struggle against oil drilling in Portugal.
JOYEETA GUPTA is professor of environment and development in the global south at the Amsterdam Institute for Social Science Research of the University of Amsterdam and UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education in Delft. At European level, she is a member of Science Europe’s Scientific Committee for the Sciences and of the Joint Programming Initiative - Climate Transdisciplinary Advisory Board in Brussels. She has published many books including “Climate Change Convention and Developing Countries - From Conflict to Consensus?, Environment and Policy Series (2001) and ‘History of Global Climate Governance’ in 2014.




STATES OF RESERVE – THE LEGALITY OF INVISIBLE REGIMES
Recorded on Thursday, September 10, 2015, 6:30–8 pm, at CAC Vilnius, Lithuania.

SPEAKERS: Cormac Cullinan, Joana Rafael, Paulo Tavares.

This session investigates the impact of legal frameworks developed around the phenomena of territorial and resource fetishism, speculating on the interplay between physical and legal systems and their impact over the debate of property and life. Inquiring into the influence of climatology and earth sciences on international affairs and the development of transparent policies, we aim to address new models of agency resulting from the dispute of biological domination.
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CORMAC CULLINAN is a South African environmental lawyer, author and activist. His book Wild Law: a manifesto for Earth justice (first published in 2002) has helped inspire a global rights of nature movement. He led the drafting of the 2010 Universal Declaration of the Rights of Mother Earth; is an executive committee member of the Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature and a judge on the International Tribunal for the Rights of Nature. Cullinan has addressed the General Assembly of the United Nations and many international conferences on how to redesign human governance systems to be be compatible with the laws of nature.
JOANA RAFAEL is an architect and theorist. She holds a MA from the CCCB (Centre de Cultura Contemporània de Barcelona), a MRes in Research Architecture and a PhD in Visual Cultures from Goldsmiths, University of London. Her work spans the disciplinary boundaries of architectural practice and theory, the Arts, scientific and technological studies, ecological thought and political philosophy. Rafael’s current research investigates crises of the Earth and Architecture as manifested in acts of reservation and bounded spaces. She is the recipient of a research grant of the FCT (Fundação Ciência e Tecnologia), and has published in diverse architecture and design magazines including Actar, San Rocco and EROS. Sh has lectured at Central Saint Martins, London and the University for the Creative Arts, Canterbury. Currently, she is the editor of Public Domain magazine, and a consultant for an Architecture & Research office and Design gallery, in Milan. She is also currently developing her PhD project for publication. This book will examine how reserve realities are enacted through a hybrid repertoire of actions, speculative engineering and system design, that simulate and assimilate patterns of crisis to sustain, rather than negate, the threat of The End.
PAULO TAVARES (Quito/London) is architect and urbanist, graduated in Brazil and teaches at Goldsmiths, where he is also completing a PhD. His work is chiefly concerned with spatial politics, ecology and media. Recent projects deal with the relations between environmental violence and law in the case of the internal armed conflict in Guatemala and the colonization of the Amazon during the military dictatorship in Brazil. He also teaches in the Facultad de Arquitectura, Diseño y Artes at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Ecuador.




GRIEF AND CLIMATE CHANGE
Recorded on Wednesday 9 September 2015, 1–2:30 pm, at CAC Vilnius, Lithuania.

SPEAKERS: Clive Hamilton, Ashlee Cunsolo Willox, Lori Gruen.

An investigation into the methodologies of approach to ‘climate deniers’ and their reasoning, as well as the flipside of grief: how to psychologically adapt to the repercussions of natural disasters today? This session identifies the psychological response in an era of global warming on both the climate denier side of the equation as well as victims who have weathered a natural catastrophe and the effects thereafter. What is the mournable body beyond the human? Are non-human entities fellow vulnerable beings capable of our mourning? What kind of concerted political action exists for these beings?
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CLIVE HAMILTON is an Australian academic and the author of a number of books, including Growth Fetish, Requiem for a Species: Why We Resist the Truth About Climate Change and, most recently, Earthmasters: The Dawn of the Age of Climate Engineering. He is currently writing a book on the larger meaning of the Anthropocene. Clive was the founder and, for 14 years until 2008, executive director of the Australia Institute, the nation’s leading progressive think tank. He is currently Professor of Public Ethics at Charles Sturt University in Canberra. He has held various visiting academic positions, including at Yale University, Sciences Po and the University of Oxford.
ASHLEE CUNSOLO WILLOX is a Canadian academic and passionate environmental advocate, working at the intersection of place, culture, health, and environment. She has been working with Inuit in Nunatsiavut Labrador on the psychological impacts of a changing environment, pioneering work in climate change and mental health. She has a particular interest in Indigenous health and cultural resurgence, and environmentally-based grief and mourning. She is a member of the Royal Society of Canada’s College of New Artists, Scholars, and Scientists, and was named one of 75 Women for Nature by Nature Canada.
LORI GRUEN is currently Professor of Philosophy, Environmental Studies, and Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, at Wesleyan University where she also coordinates Wesleyan Animal Studies. She is a Fellow of the prestigious Hastings Center for Bioethics. She has published extensively on topics in ecofeminism, animal ethics and practical ethics more broadly. She is the author of three books on animal ethics, most recently Entangled Empathy (Lantern, 2015) and the editor of five books, including Ecofeminism: Feminist Intersections with Other Animals and the Earth with Carol J. Adams (Bloomsbury, July 2014) and the Ethics of Captivity (Oxford, May 2014); and the author of dozens of articles and book chapters.




MOLECULAR COLONIALISM IN THE REIGN OF MICROORGANISMS
Recorded on Sunday 6 September 2015, 6:30–8 pm, at CAC Vilnius, Lithuania.

SPEAKERS: Stefan Helmreich, Fran Gallardo, Jenna Sutela.

This session inquires into how the study of organic networks helps redefine biological frontiers and reconceive our very notion of planetary scale. Waves, mud, and filtering organisms such as fungi, are examples of organic entities that register minor changes in our environment. Taking into consideration the behaviour of microorganisms as pivotal agents operating towards the mutation and evolution of living systems, we aim to think about the realm of molecular cartographies, and address their potential impact on bio and social structures. What are the limits of our instrumentalisation of scientific tools, representation regimes, and their impact upon our perception of life?
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STEFAN HELMREICH received his PhD in Anthropology from Stanford University and prior to coming to MIT held fellowships at Cornell, Rutgers, and NYU. His research examines the works and lives of biologists thinking through the limits of "life" as a category of analysis. Alien Ocean: Anthropological Voyages in Microbial Seas (University of California Press, 2009) is a study of marine biologists working in realms usually out of sight and reach: the microscopic world, the deep sea, and oceans outside national sovereignty. This book, winner of the 2010 Senior Book Prize from the American Ethnological Society, the 2010 Gregory Bateson Book Prize from Society for Cultural Anthropology, and the 2012 Rachel Carson Book Prize from the Society for Social Studies of Science, charts how marine microbes are entangled with debates about the origin of life, climate change, property in the ocean commons, and the possibility of life on other worlds. An earlier book, Silicon Second Nature: Culturing Artificial Life in a Digital World (University of California Press, 1998) is an ethnography of computer modeling in the life sciences. In 2000, it won the Diana Forsythe Book Prize from the American Anthropological Association. Helmreich's newest research concerns the cultural circulation of such abstractions as "water," "sound," and "waves." His essays have appeared in Critical Inquiry, Representations, American Anthropologist, and The Wire. New book is Sounding the Limits of Life: Essays in the Anthropology of Biology and Beyond (Princeton, 2016).
FRAN GALLARDO is a cultural “thingker” and imaginative technologist whose work explores the interface between ecology, technology and society. Within the umbrella of critical practices, or practice as a critique, Gallardo develops research forms often referred as art-led-enquiry. In other words, by using forms of critical creativity and radical experimentation he aims to re-imagine models of interaction in physical and social spheres. Gallardo is currently a PhD Candidate at the School of Geography with affiliated appointments in NMAT-Lab both at Queen Mary University. He is also a Visiting Professor at the Centre for Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths. Gallardo is leading the project Talking Dirty: Tasting mud, networks of organisms (including humans) and post-environmental politics at the Mouth of the Thames, which aims to explore the multiple scales of biopower, governability and everyday life flowing through the Thames Estuary. Through a series of tasting experiments, public performances, and social media outlets, Gallardo asks, “How are different modes of “Slow Violence” sensed and made sense of through the analytical, critical and playful tools of our tongues?”
JENNA SUTELA has written, directed, installed and performed projects explore the ways in which we interface with technology. Her work has been presented, among other places, at Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin, Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma, Helsinki and South London Gallery and writing published by, for example, Frieze, Harvard Design Magazine and Sternberg Press. Sutela has a background in media and design research. She currently lives and works between Helsinki and Berlin.




THE PHARMAKON
Recorded on Saturday 5 September 2015, 6:30–8pm, at CAC Vilnius, Lithuania.

SPEAKERS: Barbara Orland, Carolina Caycedo, Pedro Neves Marques.

The body and the earth as a remedy and poison. How to heal the partition in the modern age and within our crisis with nature?
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BARBARA ORLAND is a Senior Lecturer of the history of the life sciences at the University of Basel in Switzerland. In 2007-2008 she was awarded the Käthe-Leichter guest professorship at the University of Vienna (Institute of Economic and Social History, Contemporary History Institute). Before she worked as a senior scientist at the Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, among others the chair of “History of Technology“ (1999-2004) and the Collegium Helveticum. Between 2004 and 2007 she was the managing director of the Center “History of Knowledge“ at the Federal Institute of Technology and the University of Zurich. Her current research interests range from the history of the life sciences and biomedicine, for example, scientific concepts of fertilization and pregnancy, nutrition and metabolism, and biomaterials like blood and milk.
CAROLINA CAYCEDO is an artist whose practice moves beyond the bounds of the studio, gallery and institution, extending into the realm of the social, where she explores systems of movement and exchange, as well as processes of assimilation and resistance. She engages with issues and contexts that affect a broad public on an everyday level; in her work, art functions as a tool for offering alternative models to inhabit a world in which individuals and communities are increasingly subject to commodification, exploitation and discrimination. She has developed publicly engaged projects in Bogotá, Madrid, Lisbon, San Juan, New York, San Francisco and London. Her work has been shown by Creative Time, the Queens Museum, Vienna Secession and DAAD Gallery in Berlin. She has participated in numerous international biennials, including Berlin (2014), Havana (2009), Venice (2003) and Istanbul (2001). In 2012, Caycedo was a DAAD Artist-in-Berlin resident.
PEDRO NEVES MARQUES is a visual artist and writer. He is the editor of the anthology on "Antropofagia", anthropology, and indigenous cosmologies in Brazil, The Forest and The School/ Where to Sit at the Dinner Table? (Archive Books, and Akademie der Kunste der Welt, 2015) and the author of the short-story collection, The Integration Process (Atlas Projectos, 2012). Among others, he has shown at e-flux (NYC), Sculpture Center (NYC), Casa do Povo (São Paulo), XII Cuenca Biennial (Cuenca), EDP Foundation (Lisbon), Serralves Museum for Contemporary Art (Oporto). More recently, he was a guest-editor for the e-flux issue, Supercommunity, for the 56th Biennale di Venezia. Shifting between the theoretical and fictional, his work and writing has focused on technologies of embodiment and crossings between distinct ontologies, including comparisons ranging between ecology, economics, and anthropology, with a particular interest in non-modern systems of knowledge in South America. This has included the cosmopolitical role of interspecies predation and cannibalism in Amerindian societies, geophagy and the diffuse border between pollution, the body and the earth, perspectivist and multinaturalist theories, as well as the historical ramifications between economics, cybernetics, and our current environmental catastrophe.




PROTOTYPE – THE ANTHROPOCENE
Recorded on Saturday 29 November 2014, 12–14 pm, at CAC Vilnius, Lithuania.

SPEAKERS: Etienne Turpin, Nabil Ahmed, Rory Rowan.

The Anthropocene – the so-called “Geological age of man,” has emerged as a key concept in social imagination, originally grounded in the hard sciences and recently captured the attention of a range of fields, including the arts. This prototype session probes the notion of the term, what it encompasses historically, and asks what it is responsible for, amongst other theoretical concerns in the larger climate change debate.
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ETIENNE TURPIN is a philosopher studying, designing, curating, and writing about complex urban systems, political economies of data and infrastructure, visual culture and aesthetics, and Southeast Asian colonial-scientific history. In Jakarta, he is the director of anexact office and the co-principal investigator of PetaJakarta.org. At the University of Wollongong, he is a Vice-Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow with the SMART Infrastructure Facility and an Associate Research Fellow with the Australian Center for Cultural Environmental Research. He is also a member of the SYNAPSE International Curators’ Network of the Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin, where he is co-editor of the intercalations: paginated exhibition series as part of Das Anthropozän-Projekt. His most recent book, co-edited with Heather Davis, is Art in the Anthropocene: Encounters Among Aesthetics, Politics, Environments and Epistemologies (Open Humanities Press. 2015).
NABIL AHMED is a researcher, writer and educator. His work explores the politics of environmental violence mainly in South and South East Asia. He has written for Third Text, Volume, Forensis: The Architecture of Public Truth and for many other publications. More recently he has participated in the Taipei Biennale (2012), Cuenca Biennale (2014) and has exhibited at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt (HKW), and Shanghai Study Centre at the Faculty of Architecture, University of Hong Kong. He is co-founder and director of Call & Response, a sound arts organization based in London. He holds a PhD from the Centre for Research Architecture at Goldsmiths, University of London. He teaches at the School of Architecture, London Metropolitan University. He is currently a fellow at Akademie Schloss Solitude in Stuttgart.
RORY ROWAN is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Zurich's Political Geography Research Unit, where his current research focuses on the geopolitical and philosophical dimensions of the Anthropocene and earth systems governance. His work crosses the fields of geography, political theory, Continental philosophy and the environmental humanities. He has contributed writing on politics, philosophy, art and cultural criticism to a number of publications including e-Flux, Mute, Political Geography, Progress in Human Geography and Society & Space and he is co-author with Claudio Minca of the recently published On Schmitt and Space, which builds on his broader work on the spatial thought of the influential but controversial political and legal thinker Carl Schmitt. He also works collaboratively with artists and his writing has appeared in exhibitions in London, Milan, New York, Porto and São Paulo as well as part of the online platform Opening Times Art Commission. He blogs at gapingearth.com and geocritique.org